Paper Beats Rock BUT Apple Beats Coke

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Apple has surpassed Coke as the world’s No.1 brand, according to the international brand consulting firm Interbrand.
The company has been ranking brands in its annual reports since 2000, and this is the first year that Coca-Cola is not at the top of its list of 100 top global brands, released Monday.
Interbrand estimates the value of Apple’s brand at $98.3 billion US, an increase of 28 per cent over last year.

The 2013 report begins: “Every so often, a company changes our lives, not just with its products, but with its ethos. This is why, following Coca-Cola’s 13-year run at the top of Best Global Brands, Interbrand has a new No. 1 – Apple.” – Jezz Frampton
Wow, an article about the two top brands of my advertising world. In the Business Standard article Frampton was quoted saying that that Apple was “very much the poster child of the marketing community.” Now, I was under the impression that Apple was on the decline but they are the masters of planned obsoletion and keep us on our toes. I just wonder how the most “valuable” brand is calculated? This week in SEO class we talked about Assets. Not all assets are tangible so what is their worth? How could anyone even guess their brand’s value. To me it sounds like these numbers are made up. Is it possible that Apple’s numbers are skewed?
I found a great article that went more in depth to explain a brand’s value. Aswath Damodaran made a brand comparison to demonstrate a brand’s true value. “If you as a company tell me that you have a brand name, I’m going to ask you a question: ‘Do you have the power to charge a higher price for the same product?'” Damodaran said, “If your answer is no, I don’t think you have a brand. You may think you do, but I don’t think your brand has any value.” To prove the value of brand names, Damodaran compared two companies making similar products: Coca-Cola and Cott, makers of RC Cola. “Soda is water with a bunch of sugar and a lot of crap thrown in. You can put whatever you want on the outside of the can, but there is really no difference between a cola and another cola. You may say that Coca-Cola tastes different — that’s what 100 years of playing with your mind does to you,” he stated. The cola business, then, is all about branding, not the product, he stated.

“Damodaran valued Coca-Cola’s business at $79.6 billion, while the value of Cott was limited to $15.4 billion. To figure out the pricing premium, he simply subtracted Cott’s value from Coca-Cola’s value, arriving at a $64.2 billion total worth for Coke’s brand alone. That’s about 80% of the company’s value. Damodaran noted that the key number driving the valuation is the companies’ operating margins — Coca-Cola’s margin is 15.57%, while Cott’s is 5.28%. The typical company has an operating margin of 5-7%, so Coca-Cola’s margin is phenomenal. The bottom line: If Coca-Cola suddenly lost its brand name tomorrow, its operating margins would drop to around 5.28%, and it would lose $64.2 billion of value.” (Erica Swallow summarizing Damodaran)

So the image of the brand and it’s name is more important than the actual product. The consumers decide a brand’s worth. So today I guess we decided Apple beats Coke but who knows what will beat Apple tomorrow.

Conversion Rate and Why you Should Care

A conversion rate of a webpage is, “The measurement of the success of a paid inclusion campaign. A conversion rate is measured by the number of potential visitors performing the desired action, whether the action is buying a product, filling out a form, or some other goal of the web page.”

One of the most important parts of search engine marketing is the analytics. The conversion rate relates right back to the analytics. At the end of a campaign you want to know how successful it was or wasn’t. The conversion rate is to help see whether of not all your goals were met.

For example, if you payed for 200 pay per click ads and 20 people clicked through and bought your product. Your conversion rate is 10% for that product.

Conversion rates are the keys to measuring success and that’s why you should care.

Blogging? Yes? No? or Maybe?

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So I read this article about whether blogging is necessary or not.

I personally think that it couldn’t hurt (though I’m a little biased… I’m writing this on my blog). In this week’s SEO class we discussed adding outbound links to increase your SEO and makes you look more credible while creating content for your website. The article also mentions that blogging is another way to converse with your customers or readers. Customer feedback is important and it makes your brand more transparent. Blogs are easy to share and can be linked up to various social media sites.

Some of the reasons why it might not be so import is because other social mediums that are more appropriate to your brand might take precedence. It’s also possible that you could be a too popular and it would be very time consuming but that’s not very likely.

So my advice is, blog on. I mean what do you have to lose?

Google Leaves Me No Choice

I always thought Google would take over,

now I’m convinced it will. The other day I went to sign on to my Youtube account and I got bullied in a Google+ account. What? How can they do that? For a long time I had brushed Google+ off but they have so much clout on the internet that they have the power to make their social media the next big thing. Now I doubt they can make people use it but they can make people (like me) join. 

In the future G+ might be a very handy application because let’s face it, I’m on (we’re all on) Google a lot. This will help link all the different platforms we use but I was just taken by surprise at how I had to submit to Google. There are so many articles on people being forced to join Google+.

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I’m not sure it will be a bad thing.